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Automating document delivery with help from CloudStor’s FileSender

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Items from the Uni Melbourne Archives

The University of Melbourne’s eScholarship Research Centre is using FileSender as part of an automated process that’s delivering archival documents to users within minutes, rather than weeks.

FileSender — the file sending component of CloudStor, AARNet’s large file sharing and storage service for researchers — was integrated into a user-initiated archive delivery service that requires no human intervention.

Director of the eScholarship Research Centre, Associate Professor Gavan McCarthy, explains that the fully-automated delivery service has transformed the time taken to respond to requests for documents.

“The entire process, from request to delivery, takes a matter of minutes, where it could previously take days, if not weeks,” A/P McCarthy said.

“The entire process takes a matter of minutes, where it could previously take days, if not weeks.”

“Responding to requests also typically involves no human intervention, saving considerable time spent on administration for our staff.”

A/P McCarthy explains that CloudStor was selected for the document delivery component of the service because of its ability to document the process of transfer and to communicate the conditions and obligations associated with the transfer.

“With FileSender, both sender and receiver have email documentation that can be used as a record of the transaction, and the archive can receive confirmation that the researcher has downloaded the materials.”

“In addition, the emails to researchers articulate the conditions and obligations associated with the transfer, which is important because many archival materials are rights-compromised or contain personal or sensitive information.”

Find out more about the work done by the eScholarship Research Centre to create its automated document delivery service in this case study: Automating the delivery of documents in minutes, not weeks.


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